Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan

One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, two teens—both named Will Grayson—are about to cross paths. As their worlds collide and intertwine, the Will Graysons find their lives going in new and unexpected directions, building toward romantic turns-of-heart and the epic production of history’s most fabulous high school musical. 

Hello internetees! So, it’s no big secret that I’m a John Green fan (I know, you’re shocked, right?) and to my complete surprise, I haven’t reviewed a single John Green book. What kind of a fan am I?

So, I decided to review the least cliché book of John Green’s – Will Grayson, Will Grayson.

If I had to summarize this book, using one word, that word would have to be adorable. Although, not adorable in the sense that a baby is adorable, but adorable in it’s a lovely story that I completely adore, kind of sense (and I just had an abundance of the word “adorable”, didn’t I?).

I am going to spoil the story a little bit, because I’m not really sure how to write this review without spoiling… so, here goes.

The “Gay-Will-Grayson” (Levithan’s Grayson) is a very bitter person, and although I think that Levithan may have overdone it with the “I’m-an-angry-teenager-and-I-hate-everyone-and-everything” concept, it does fit in with the characters personality.

A picture of what the cover of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, looks like.

A picture of what the cover of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, looks like.

The other Will Grayson is more approachable, in my opinion. Not only can I relate to him more (he is also a complete and utter geek), but also he’s very normal. Normality always makes a story better (for lack of a better word), because you can relate it back to things you already know.

The story so filled with, well, emotion – and I’m referring to the good kind of emotion. This book will make you laugh, it will make you cry, it will make you empathise. That’s, what I think, is one of the most important motif’s of this story – empathy.

The way Green and Levithan have made this story so impossible real, is because of their amazing ability to make the reader sympathize with the characters. We feel their pain, almost, as if it were our own.

The people in the story are so life-like – I could imagine myself around these people; I could picture myself into the story, which is really what all writers should strive for.

The only annoying part of the story was the fact that Levithan chose not to capitalize. At all. Seriously people, I’m not joking when I say that all the I’s were i’s. None of the names were capitalized, either. I kind of get what Levithan was trying to do – which was to more accurately simulate the mind of one of the “Will Graysons” – but regardless of that, it was just annoying to read. Not to mention difficult to read.

Personally, I liked Green’s Will Grayson more than I liked Levithan’s Will Grayson – I found Green’s Will Grayson more, well, human. But then again, I’m very biased towards Green.

I would recommend this book for everybody, but perhaps even more specifically teenagers. It’s an amazing book, and you’d be stupid to miss an opportunity to read it.

And yes, I realize how cliché this post is… but sometimes, embracing the clichés is really the only viable option, don’t you think?

Have a fantastic rest of the day, everyone!

An image of John Green (left) and David Levithan (right)

An image of John Green (left) and David Levithan (right)

 

 

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