Quote About Books and Life

“When you sell a man a book you don’t sell just twelve ounces of paper and ink and glue – you sell him a whole new life.”

Christopher Morley

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Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green & David Levithan

One cold night, in a most unlikely corner of Chicago, two teens—both named Will Grayson—are about to cross paths. As their worlds collide and intertwine, the Will Graysons find their lives going in new and unexpected directions, building toward romantic turns-of-heart and the epic production of history’s most fabulous high school musical. 

Hello internetees! So, it’s no big secret that I’m a John Green fan (I know, you’re shocked, right?) and to my complete surprise, I haven’t reviewed a single John Green book. What kind of a fan am I?

So, I decided to review the least cliché book of John Green’s – Will Grayson, Will Grayson.

If I had to summarize this book, using one word, that word would have to be adorable. Although, not adorable in the sense that a baby is adorable, but adorable in it’s a lovely story that I completely adore, kind of sense (and I just had an abundance of the word “adorable”, didn’t I?).

I am going to spoil the story a little bit, because I’m not really sure how to write this review without spoiling… so, here goes.

The “Gay-Will-Grayson” (Levithan’s Grayson) is a very bitter person, and although I think that Levithan may have overdone it with the “I’m-an-angry-teenager-and-I-hate-everyone-and-everything” concept, it does fit in with the characters personality.

A picture of what the cover of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, looks like.

A picture of what the cover of Will Grayson, Will Grayson, looks like.

The other Will Grayson is more approachable, in my opinion. Not only can I relate to him more (he is also a complete and utter geek), but also he’s very normal. Normality always makes a story better (for lack of a better word), because you can relate it back to things you already know.

The story so filled with, well, emotion – and I’m referring to the good kind of emotion. This book will make you laugh, it will make you cry, it will make you empathise. That’s, what I think, is one of the most important motif’s of this story – empathy.

The way Green and Levithan have made this story so impossible real, is because of their amazing ability to make the reader sympathize with the characters. We feel their pain, almost, as if it were our own.

The people in the story are so life-like – I could imagine myself around these people; I could picture myself into the story, which is really what all writers should strive for.

The only annoying part of the story was the fact that Levithan chose not to capitalize. At all. Seriously people, I’m not joking when I say that all the I’s were i’s. None of the names were capitalized, either. I kind of get what Levithan was trying to do – which was to more accurately simulate the mind of one of the “Will Graysons” – but regardless of that, it was just annoying to read. Not to mention difficult to read.

Personally, I liked Green’s Will Grayson more than I liked Levithan’s Will Grayson – I found Green’s Will Grayson more, well, human. But then again, I’m very biased towards Green.

I would recommend this book for everybody, but perhaps even more specifically teenagers. It’s an amazing book, and you’d be stupid to miss an opportunity to read it.

And yes, I realize how cliché this post is… but sometimes, embracing the clichés is really the only viable option, don’t you think?

Have a fantastic rest of the day, everyone!

An image of John Green (left) and David Levithan (right)

An image of John Green (left) and David Levithan (right)

 

 

Preview of The Chance of Invincibility

Hello everyone! So, I was reviewing the first chapter of the book I’m currently working on, and I figured that I’d give everyone a sneak peek – a tiny preview if you will.

Now, this is still a first draft, and I haven’t even nearly finished the story, but I do rather like this very first page of the very first chapter. Check it out:

     I am alone.

     I have been alone for 6 months, now.

     Irrevocably alone? I hope not.

     Eternally alone? If there only was such a thing as an eternity, an endless continuity.

     Selectively alone? I think so.

     Depressingly alone? Probably.

    In my opinion, loneliness isn’t something that can be defined as “a complex and usually unpleasant emotional response to isolation”. It’s larger than that, isn’t it? It’s an esoteric, voluminous, void that essentially takes over the larger part of a persons life. There has never been a happy ending for someone who is completely, utterly, and dishearteningly, alone. There is no such thing as cheerfully isolated, or is there?

     Have I ever experienced loneliness? Unquestionably.

     Have I ever dreaded it? Perhaps.

     Have I ever relished in it? Can one even relish in seclusion?

     Am I lonely now? I’m doing this, so I guess it’s up to you to decide that.

     Perhaps there is something as blessedly alone? You can’t be expected to like everyone all the time. I mean, can people demand that you should constantly feel the ubiquitous presence of love, and completeness?  Or rather, people shouldn’t be expected to want to feel that all the time? What is so distasteful about being by yourself? Is it so iniquitous to want to be by yourself? I want to be by myself, so perhaps there is something wrong with me.

     Am I writing this surreptitiously? I’m not sure.

     Am I writing this openly? Define openly.

     Am I writing this biasedly? Anyone who has ever written anything has done so biasedly, have they not?

     Should I even be writing this? You tell me.

     I have often pondered over my emotions, perhaps more than I should have. However, I can’t help but come to the conclusion the concept of defining my emotions, such as loneliness, is a waste of my time. Why do I need to define what I’m feeling? Can’t I just feel what I feel, and you feel what you feel, and everyone just feeling what they’re feeling by their selves? I mean, why does everyone need to know what feelings mean? Shouldn’t the point of feelings be its elusiveness?

So… what do you think? Should I just give up writing all together because of my obvious “suckieness”? Tell me what you think in the comments section below!

Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Before Peter Pan belonged to Wendy, he belonged to the girl with the crow feather in her hair. . . .

Fifteen-year-old Tiger Lily doesn’t believe in love stories or happy endings. Then she meets the alluring teenage Peter Pan in the forbidden woods of Neverland and immediately falls under his spell.

Peter is unlike anyone she’s ever known. Impetuous and brave, he both scares and enthralls her. As the leader of the Lost Boys, the most fearsome of Neverland’s inhabitants, Peter is an unthinkable match for Tiger Lily. Soon, she is risking everything—her family, her future—to be with him. When she is faced with marriage to a terrible man in her own tribe, she must choose between the life she’s always known and running away to an uncertain future with Peter.

With enemies threatening to tear them apart, the lovers seem doomed. But it’s the arrival of Wendy Darling, an English girl who’s everything Tiger Lily is not, that leads Tiger Lily to discover that the most dangerous enemies can live inside even the most loyal and loving heart.

Tiger+LilyTiger Lily – ah, such a bitter sweet book. It’s one of those books that you  love, but at the same time you hate it.

My opinion, however, is that I LOVE it! L. O. V. E. It.

Tiger Lily is a very special person, I guess you could say. She’s very head-strong, and that’s probably what I love most about her – she’s so fearless, in a way. Does she have some aspects to her that I don’t like? Yes, she does – but that’s what makes the entire book seem more realistic, because no one in real life is perfect. Right?

The love story of Peter Pan and Tiger Lily is kind of (SPOILER ALERT!) tragic. However, you do kind of know what you’re getting yourself into before you even commence with the read. I mean, look at the description for a second. Not exactly enthusiastic, is it?

However, this is one of those books that will make you contemplate over things, and it’s good for you to read a book like this every once in a while… Not every time, because then you would become an emotional wreck, but every now and then is beneficial.

Oh, a tiny spoiler now – this is the first time I’ve ever found Wendy odious. Seriously, people who have read Tiger Lily will know what I mean when I say that I absolutely hate Wendy.

In summary, this book is sad, and it is tragic, but that doesn’t make it any less of a good book. You should read it, or at least have it on the top of your “To Read” pile.

Anyone else read Tiger Lily? Anyone going to read it now, after my review? Let me know in the comments below!

P.S. Anyone else see the Host and completely love it? Let me know – you know where.

P.P.S Thank you Goodreads, for the description of the book.

Quote of the Week #1

Anyone who says they have only one life to live must not know how to read a book. 

~Author Unknown

This quote always reminds me of a introduction to a book called, The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin. The introduction talks about how, when people read, they are momentarily insane – believing in in people that don’t exist, living in a world that’s not the “real one”.

How about you? Does it remind you of anything? Let me know in the comments below!

(p.s. sorry for the late post, but I was at the hospital yesterday, and I got home really late and spent about three hours doing homework. Safe to say, I pretty much fainted on my bed the moment I finished everything I had to do.)